FDA Approves First New Alzheimer's Drug in Nearly Two Decades

FDA Approves First New Alzheimer's Drug in Nearly Two Decades

06/10/2021

Photo: Pixabay

wusa9.com

Government health officials on Monday approved the first new drug for Alzheimer’s disease in nearly 20 years, disregarding warnings from independent advisers that the much-debated treatment hasn’t been shown to help slow the brain-destroying disease.

The Food and Drug Administration said it granted approval to the drug developed by Biogen for patients with Alzheimer's disease.

It’s the only drug that U.S. regulators have said can likely treat the underlying disease, rather than manage symptoms like anxiety and insomnia.

The decision, which could impact millions of older Americans and their families, is certain to spark disagreements among physicians, medical researchers, and patient groups. It also has far-reaching implications for the standards used to evaluate experimental therapies, including those that show only incremental benefits.

The new drug, which Biogen developed with Japan’s Eisai Co., did not reverse the mental decline, only slowing it in one study. Named Aduhelm, the medication is given as an infusion every four weeks.

The FDA's top drug regulator acknowledged in a statement that “residual uncertainties” surround the drug, but said Aduhelm's ability to reduce harmful clumps of plaque in the brain “is expected” to help slow dementia.

Under terms of the approval, the FDA is requiring the drugmaker to conduct a follow-up study to confirm benefits for patients. If the study fails to show effectiveness, the FDA could pull the drug from the market, though the agency rarely does so.

Biogen did not immediately disclose the price, though analysts have estimated the drug could cost between $30,000 and $50,000 for a year's worth of treatment.

A preliminary analysis by one group found that the drug would need to be priced at $2,500 to $8,300 per year to be a good value based on the “small overall health gains” suggested by company studies. The non-profit Institute for Clinical and Economic Review added that “any price is too high” if the drug’s benefit isn’t confirmed in follow-up studies.

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